Ear Mite Medication Ingredients
Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith

Summary

Ear mite medications will treat ear mite infestations; they will NOT have an affect on bacterial or yeast infections. A proper diagnosis through microscopic examination of the debris in the ear should be obtained prior to treatment. All affected animals must be treated and the length of treatment should be long enough to kill all mites, or the infestation will recur.

Generic Name
Rotenone, Pyrethrins

Brand Names
Rotenone: Ear Mitecide, Ear Mite Lotion, Ear Miticide

Pyrethrins: Cerumite, Mita-Clear, Drs. Foster and Smith Miticide, Nolvamite

Type of Drug
Insecticide

Form and Storage
Drops and lotion
Store at room temperature.

Indications for Use
Treatment of ear mites in dogs, cats, and rabbits.

General Information
FDA approved for use in treating ear mites in dogs and cats. Rotenone is also approved for use in rabbits. Available by prescription and over the counter. Ear mites are passed from one infested animal to another through close enough contact that the mite has time to crawl from one to the other such as from a mother dog or cat and to her offspring. Typically, ears infested with ear mites have a dark waxy, flaky debris in them, similar to coffee grounds. Both ears are usually affected. The mites can be easily seen under a microscope at low power. Once the mites are gone, they will not recur unless the pet is exposed to another animal with them again (such as a new puppy or kitten in the house).

Usual Dose and Administration
It is essential to clean ears before applying the medication. Apply amount of drops or lotion according to label. Massage in well and wipe excess from the flap and inside of the ear. Repeat every 2-3 days for 4-8 weeks. Note that this may be a longer period of treatment than that described on the label, but it has been found that to treat less often or for a shorter time period, the mites may not be eliminated. Other medications such as ivermectin injections have been shown to treat ear mites and have frequently been used, although ivermectin has not been FDA-approved for this use. Contact your veterinarian if you have difficulty treating your pet or you have a large number of pets to treat.

Side Effects
Unlikely. May see skin irritation. Cats may drool when ears are cleaned.

Contraindications/Warnings
Not for use in patients hypersensitive (allergic) to the drug.

All types may not be for use in patients less than 7 weeks of age. Read the labels. Contact your veterinarian before treating young animals.

Need to treat all the dogs, cats, and rabbits in the house at the same time, or they will reinfest each other again.

If poor response to treatment or the symptoms recur, it may be an ear infection and not mites or an ear infection in addition to mites. Contact your veterinarian.

May be toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Dispose of container properly.

If medication comes in contact with pet's eyes, flush eyes thoroughly and contact your veterinarian.

Drug or Food Interactions
Unlikely to have drug or food interactions.

If using a topical ear antibiotic also, separate treatments by several hours to allow the first medication time to work before it is removed during application of second product.

Overdose/Toxicity
Unlikely with the ear drops or lotion.

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Keep this and all other medications out of the reach of children and pets.


If you think your pet has been poisoned...

Contact your veterinarian or one of the Animal Poison Hotlines (listed below) if you think your pet may have accidentally received or been given an overdose of the medication.

**ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center

1-888-4ANI-HELP (1-888-426-4435). $65.00 per case, billed to caller's credit card.

Follow-up calls can be made for no additional charge by dialing 888-299-2973.

There is no charge when the call involves a product covered by the Animal Product Safety Service.

**Pet Poison Helpline - 24-hour service available throughout North America for pet owners and veterinary professionals who require assistance with treating a potentially poisoned pet.

1-800-213-6680 ($35.00 per incident). Staffed 24-hours a day.


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Reprinted from PetEducation.com.